Small company or big company? We explore the pros and cons

27/06/2017

Size isn’t everything

When you first set out on your career path as a graduate, you’ll probably think about joining a large company.

 

 

 

They often have recognisable Graduate Training Programmes and a reputation of being ‘the’ place to begin your career.  They have a familiar name, a good reputation within industry and business, and you might want a job mixing with the big names, but give a thought to Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). They have a lot to offer a sparky individual and you may find one that’s a hidden treasure.

 

Here we look at the pros and cons of SMEs – read on to find out why one might be just right for you…

 

Pros

 

·         Small companies have to be flexible – they will need an effective plan to survive however the economy is performing. They generally have less overheads so can be resilient in times of economic downturn.

 

·         Everyone needs to get on together – existing staff will be welcoming and make an effort to help you settle in. It’s important that you all work as a team, and it can often feel like a family with everyone doing their bit.

 

·         Working for a small company means that you’ll often get to see the bigger picture – the overall view of how the company works within your chosen industry. And by virtue of this fact, you’re likely to wear more hats, interact with all levels of seniority and see and hear more about what’s going on.

 

·         You’ll immediately need to be hands on and involved – with minimal shadowing, you’ll need to earn your money and prove your worth!

 

·         With a small company, your work will be visible – there’s no hiding within a large department. You’ll be able to shine more rapidly and can progress your career through working effectively. You can really make a difference.

 

·         You’re less likely to get bored! With everyone having to work closely together as part of a team, you’ll often find yourself doings things that you wouldn’t have the opportunity to do in a larger company.

 

·         There’s often less bureaucracy – you’ll be able to get answers to questions and decisions can be made more quickly.

 

·         You’ll gain skills across a wider area and can use these experiences to grow as an individual as well as further develop your skill set which you can take with you to your next role.

 

·         It’s often a great stepping stone to a larger employer within the same industry – or development and promotion in the smaller company as it expands. It’s great to have been there at the beginning and know that you made a difference!

 

Cons

 

·         There are likely to be fewer formal training programmes.

 

·         The benefits packages are generally smaller as larger companies reap the benefits of discounts simply by having a larger number of employees – pension, private health care, corporate discounts etc.

 

·         There will be less chance to move around departments, offices and locations simply because the company is smaller. 

 

·         The salaries can really vary – there are usually industry standards to help keep things in line.  Whilst larger companies have more in the pot, a smaller company will have less overheads and can be more flexible.

 

The ultimate choice will come down to where you feel more comfortable – don’t overlook an SME without carefully considering all the options. As a first role after graduating, it’s a good place to start, giving you the chance to learn the ropes quickly, make a visible difference and be in the right place to develop your career as the company grows.

 

Good luck from the mybrink team!

 

 

Size isn’t everything!

 

When you first set out on your career path as a graduate, you’ll probably think about joining a large company. They often have recognisable Graduate Training Programmes and a reputation of being ‘the’ place to begin your career.  They have a familiar name, a good reputation within industry and business, and you might want a job mixing with the big names, but give a thought to Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). They have a lot to offer a sparky individual and you may find one that’s a hidden treasure.

 

Here we look at the pros and cons of SMEs – read on to find out why one might be just right for you…

 

Pros

 

·         Small companies have to be flexible – they will need an effective plan to survive however the economy is performing. They generally have less overheads so can be resilient in times of economic downturn.

 

·         Everyone needs to get on together – existing staff will be welcoming and make an effort to help you settle in. It’s important that you all work as a team, and it can often feel like a family with everyone doing their bit.

 

·         Working for a small company means that you’ll often get to see the bigger picture – the overall view of how the company works within your chosen industry. And by virtue of this fact, you’re likely to wear more hats, interact with all levels of seniority and see and hear more about what’s going on.

 

·         You’ll immediately need to be hands on and involved – with minimal shadowing, you’ll need to earn your money and prove your worth!

 

·         With a small company, your work will be visible – there’s no hiding within a large department. You’ll be able to shine more rapidly and can progress your career through working effectively. You can really make a difference.

 

·         You’re less likely to get bored! With everyone having to work closely together as part of a team, you’ll often find yourself doings things that you wouldn’t have the opportunity to do in a larger company.

 

·         There’s often less bureaucracy – you’ll be able to get answers to questions and decisions can be made more quickly.

 

·         You’ll gain skills across a wider area and can use these experiences to grow as an individual as well as further develop your skill set which you can take with you to your next role.

 

·         It’s often a great stepping stone to a larger employer within the same industry – or development and promotion in the smaller company as it expands. It’s great to have been there at the beginning and know that you made a difference!

 

Cons

 

·         There are likely to be fewer formal training programmes.

 

·         The benefits packages are generally smaller as larger companies reap the benefits of discounts simply by having a larger number of employees – pension, private health care, corporate discounts etc.

 

·         There will be less chance to move around departments, offices and locations simply because the company is smaller. 

 

·         The salaries can really vary – there are usually industry standards to help keep things in line.  Whilst larger companies have more in the pot, a smaller company will have less overheads and can be more flexible.

 

The ultimate choice will come down to where you feel more comfortable – don’t overlook an SME without carefully considering all the options. As a first role after graduating, it’s a good place to start, giving you the chance to learn the ropes quickly, make a visible difference and be in the right place to develop your career as the company grows.

 

Good luck from the mybrink team!